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Sexual Health

Learning about pleasure, safer sex practices, PrEP, PEP, as well as making condoms and dental dams a part of our culture at UC Santa Barbara can increase sexual satisfaction and health. The best way to get started is to learn about your resources and find out how you can get more information, get tested regularly, get vaccinated, get free condoms, or get a prescription for birth control.

Sexual Health Tips

Tip #1
Sexual consent is defined as obtaining an informed, sober, verbal, enthusiastic “Yes” from a sexual partner(s). Consent can be revoked at any time.
Tip #2
You can get STI testing for free at Student Health under the UC SHIP plan. Another option is to visit the Santa Barbara Pacific Pride Foundation located downtown, IV Neighborhood Clinic, or Planned Parenthood. Websites for more information: studenthealth.sa.ucsb.edu & pacificpridefoundation.org
Tip #3
Talking about past sexual histories, establishing a monogamous relationship (if in open relationship, always use protection), getting tested, and obtaining latex barriers to use during penetration are ways to prevent STIs. 

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Relationship Health

There are so many relationships on campus: hookups, friends with benefits, romantic, sexual, platonic and more! Learning to navigate and self advocate in relationships can improve the mutual benefits of any relationship! Learning relationship phases, communication skills, identifying personal boundaries, and clarifying your own values are wonderful tools to have as you create new relationships in your life at UC Santa Barbara and beyond!

Relationship Health Tips

Tip #1
In the first phase of romantic relationships, Attraction, testosterone (androgens) spike in all sexes and are responsible for feelings of nervousness and excitement and typically make you ignore red flags exhibited by your partner.
Tip #2
CARE (Campus Advocacy and Resource Center) offers free student services for students impacted by sexual assault, dating/domestic violence, and stalking.
Tip #3
It is not until the final phase of a romantic relationship that oxytocin increases, which is the main hormone responsible for unrequited acts of love, and general feelings of fondness and connection with a person(s).

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